Los Algodones, Baja California; Mexico

This is not the End of the World, but you can see it from here!



Thursday, October 16, 2014

Wildlife Center Owner (an American) in Mexico Killed by Camel

 A 60-year-old American was killed by a camel which escaped from its pen and attacked him at a wildlife center he owned in the Mexican beach resort of Tulum, local emergency services said on Tuesday.

Richard Mileski, who was from the Chicago area, was found dead early on Monday, said Antonio Gomez, a Tulum emergency services spokesman.

"When we arrived, the people who were there said (the camel) got out of its stable and attacked him," said Gomez. "It dragged him, climbed on top of him, was kicking him, biting him and sat on top of him."

Gomez said the dromedary, which is a type of camel predominantly from the Middle East and North Africa, was then taken away by Mexico's federal agency of environmental protection Profepa. He also said the emergency services then closed the park.

Mileski was the owner of the Tulum Monkey Sanctuary where the attack took place, Gomez added. The park's website was down on Tuesday and telephone calls went unanswered.

Tulum, which is near the Caribbean beach resorts of Cancun and Playa Del Carmen, is the site of one of the most beautiful beaches in Mexico, and is popular with tourists.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Mexican Navy Contracts Damen for Two Vessels



Rendering of the FCS 5009 (Image courtesy of Damen)
Secretaria de Marina orders seventh patrol vessel and a fast crew supplier

In August 2014 the Mexican Navy (Secretaría de Marina) and the Netherlands’ Damen Shipyards Group signed contracts for the delivery of the design, material package, technical assistance and training for two vessels that will be built by the Mexican Navy, using the Damen Technical Cooperation program, which enables customers to build their vessel on the location of their choice.

The first contract is for a Damen Stan Patrol 4207, the seventh of the Tenochtitlan-class (named after the first vessel of this class in use by the Mexican Navy), to be built on the navy yard ASTIMAR 1 in Tampico. This yard, located on the Gulf of Mexico, has already concluded the construction of three Stan Patrols and will now undertake the construction of the other four.

The second contract is for a Damen Fast Crew Supplier 5009, which features the Damen Sea Axe bow that reduces slamming up to 70%. The FCS 5009 has been adapted to meet specific Mexican Navy requirements. Among others it will include a deck crane and an extra accommodation module. In total the vessel can transport 145 passengers and 17 crew members. The vessel has four Caterpillar 3512C TA engines, and can reach a speed of 21 knots. The vessel will be constructed on the Navy yard ASTIMAR 6 in Guaymas, a city on the Pacific coast of Mexico.

Damen Technical Cooperation allows yards that are not a part of the Damen Shipyards Group to build modern, high quality vessels. With the design, material packages and technical and logistical assistance, these shipyards can improve their capabilities, using the experience and taking advantage of the quality of Damen. Through this building method over five hundred vessels, on shipyards all over the globe, have been built.

damen.com
 
  • Rendering of the FCS 5009 (Image courtesy of Damen)
    Rendering of the FCS 5009 (Image courtesy of Damen)

Mexican Navy Contracts Damen for Two Vessels



Rendering of the FCS 5009 (Image courtesy of Damen)
Secretaria de Marina orders seventh patrol vessel and a fast crew supplier

In August 2014 the Mexican Navy (Secretaría de Marina) and the Netherlands’ Damen Shipyards Group signed contracts for the delivery of the design, material package, technical assistance and training for two vessels that will be built by the Mexican Navy, using the Damen Technical Cooperation program, which enables customers to build their vessel on the location of their choice.

The first contract is for a Damen Stan Patrol 4207, the seventh of the Tenochtitlan-class (named after the first vessel of this class in use by the Mexican Navy), to be built on the navy yard ASTIMAR 1 in Tampico. This yard, located on the Gulf of Mexico, has already concluded the construction of three Stan Patrols and will now undertake the construction of the other four.

The second contract is for a Damen Fast Crew Supplier 5009, which features the Damen Sea Axe bow that reduces slamming up to 70%. The FCS 5009 has been adapted to meet specific Mexican Navy requirements. Among others it will include a deck crane and an extra accommodation module. In total the vessel can transport 145 passengers and 17 crew members. The vessel has four Caterpillar 3512C TA engines, and can reach a speed of 21 knots. The vessel will be constructed on the Navy yard ASTIMAR 6 in Guaymas, a city on the Pacific coast of Mexico.

Damen Technical Cooperation allows yards that are not a part of the Damen Shipyards Group to build modern, high quality vessels. With the design, material packages and technical and logistical assistance, these shipyards can improve their capabilities, using the experience and taking advantage of the quality of Damen. Through this building method over five hundred vessels, on shipyards all over the globe, have been built.

damen.com
 
  • Rendering of the FCS 5009 (Image courtesy of Damen)
    Rendering of the FCS 5009 (Image courtesy of Damen)

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Mexico Mine Still causing Pollution, Blocking Investigation

       
A Mexican copper mine which spewed millions of gallons of acid into a river last month is still causing pollution and the facility’s owners are blocking the work of investigators probing the accident, authorities said.
The massive acid leak in August, involving some 40,000 cubic meters (10.6 million gallons) of sulfuric acid, was one of Mexico’s largest ever mining-related environmental disasters.
“As of this moment, the government of Sonora (state) totally breaks off any relationship with the mining company,” which is continuing to discharge toxic substances in the river, director of the state civil protection agency, Carlos Arias said at a press conference Friday.

The toxic acid, used to dissolve copper from ore, spilled out of a holding tank at the Buenavista copper mine in Sonora State, one of the largest in the world.
The chemical turned a 60-kilometer (40-mile) stretch of the Sonora River orange, causing authorities to shut off the municipal water supply to 20,000 people in seven towns.
Arias said since the spill, Buenavista, a subsidiary of Grupo Mexico, has blocked access to investigators, and he warned Sonora state authorities would come back — this time backed up by security forces.
“We will act with the full weight of the law, because they are already in a plan that cannot continue,” Arias said, adding the government was mulling permanent closure of the mine.
The mining company “categorically denied the accusations,” in a statement Friday night.
“Buenavista del Cobre has worked alongside state authorities,” the company said, lamenting “the politicization of the accident.”
The mining company has created a fund of two billion pesos ($147 million) to repair the environmental damage. Environmental authorities have also imposed fines of more than 44 million pesos ($3 million) over the spill.
Federal prosecutors are still investigating whether the leak was caused by shoddy construction and installation of the pipeline or, as the company argues, by excessive rains.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Border Protests starting Sept 18, 2014

Protest Plans to Shut Down Ports of Entry Moving Forward

Plans to shut down ports of entry between the United States and Mexico by a citizen protest group are being finalized. The list of ports includes six Texas ports, four in Arizona, two in New Mexico and five in California. Organizers say this is the final list and plan to move forward on all ports listed.

“This event is for Patriotic Americans who feel strongly about our nation’s sovereignty and bringing our Marine, Sgt. Tahmooressi, home,” said event organizer Stasyi Barth in a statement posted on the groups website. Sgt. Tahmooressi is being held in a Mexican jail for allegedly entering Mexico with weapons that are illegal in that country. He claims the entry was accidental.

Clarifying her previous comments about militia groups not being welcome in the protest, Barth said, “This is NOT a militia event,” Barth explained. “No militia groups have been involved in the organizing of this event, nor are they planning on participating. The mere mention of ‘militia’ draws fear and headlines, which is obviously the intent of the media.”

“We are standing up for law enforcement, not against them,” she continued.
 “This is a peaceful protest to air our grievances to our government, as allowed by the Constitution.”

In Texas, the group plans on blocking ports of entry located.
One of the leaders in Texas told another media outlet they have about 200 people lined up in Texas and expect more to just show up at the scene.
Laredo,             Rio Grande City,             Presidio, Hildago,
Brownsville            Del Rio.

California protests are scheduled for.
Calexico West,    Calexico East,    Stay Mesa,        Tecate,

San Ysidro. New Mexico protests are planned for Columbus and Santa Theresa while in Arizona, the ports of entry of Naco, Nogales, Douglas and San Luis are planned for closure.

“This event is for you, every patriotic American, to express your grievances in a safe and peaceful way,” Barth said on her website. As far as firearms Barth explained, “Yes, some states allow you to carry a firearm and I will not impede on that right. However, please keep it hidden and safely away from others.”

The website details out rules of conduct for event attendees to adhere to in order to assure the safety of all involved on both sides of the protest. She said she is anticipating counter protests and encourages all participants to not engage them. “They will say angry, hateful and vile things; do not respond” Barth continued. “They are looking for news coverage that they can point to, proving you are the bad guy.”

The events are all scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. CDT (8 a.m. PDT)           

Thursday, August 28, 2014

New Police force first test. Mexico City Kidnaping

Mexico lake town besieged by kidnappings is first assignment for new police force

The first assignment for members of a new police force created to combat crimes affecting industry, farms and businesses is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings, an official said Tuesday. Hundreds of members of the new force, known as the gendarmerie, have traveled to the town alongside a pine-rimmed lake.
A federal official said the group of officers is one of several being deployed throughout Mexico. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media.
PHOTO: FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings.
In recent weeks, kidnappers have targeted Mexico City residents who keep a second home in the town as well as working class people.
Authorities say the kidnappers are members of La Familia Michoacana drug cartel.
The group of officers is part of a special 5,000-strong police force launched last week to combat crime that is strangling commerce in some Mexican regions.
The gendarmerie is made up of fresh recruits whose average age is 28 and who have never served on another police force.
The group sent to Valle de Bravo will join about 600 other federal and Mexico state law enforcement officials, including soldiers and marines, who have recently been sent to the area 90 miles west of Mexico City.
MEXICO CITY — The first assignment for members of a new police force created to combat crimes affecting industry, farms and businesses is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings, an official said Tuesday.
Hundreds of members of the new force, known as the gendarmerie, have traveled to the town alongside a pine-rimmed lake.
A federal official said the group of officers is one of several being deployed throughout Mexico. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media.
PHOTO: FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
In recent weeks, kidnappers have targeted Mexico City residents who keep a second home in the town as well as working class people.
Authorities say the kidnappers are members of La Familia Michoacana drug cartel.
The group of officers is part of a special 5,000-strong police force launched last week to combat crime that is strangling commerce in some Mexican regions.
The gendarmerie is made up of fresh recruits whose average age is 28 and who have never served on another police force.
The group sent to Valle de Bravo will join about 600 other federal and Mexico state law enforcement officials, including soldiers and marines, who have recently been sent to the area 90 miles west of Mexico City.
MEXICO CITY — The first assignment for members of a new police force created to combat crimes affecting industry, farms and businesses is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings, an official said Tuesday.
Hundreds of members of the new force, known as the gendarmerie, have traveled to the town alongside a pine-rimmed lake.
A federal official said the group of officers is one of several being deployed throughout Mexico. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media.
PHOTO: FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
In recent weeks, kidnappers have targeted Mexico City residents who keep a second home in the town as well as working class people.
Authorities say the kidnappers are members of La Familia Michoacana drug cartel.
The group of officers is part of a special 5,000-strong police force launched last week to combat crime that is strangling commerce in some Mexican regions.
The gendarmerie is made up of fresh recruits whose average age is 28 and who have never served on another police force.
The group sent to Valle de Bravo will join about 600 other federal and Mexico state law enforcement officials, including soldiers and marines, who have recently been sent to the area 90 miles west of Mexico City.
MEXICO CITY — The first assignment for members of a new police force created to combat crimes affecting industry, farms and businesses is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings, an official said Tuesday.
Hundreds of members of the new force, known as the gendarmerie, have traveled to the town alongside a pine-rimmed lake.
A federal official said the group of officers is one of several being deployed throughout Mexico. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media.
PHOTO: FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
In recent weeks, kidnappers have targeted Mexico City residents who keep a second home in the town as well as working class people.
Authorities say the kidnappers are members of La Familia Michoacana drug cartel.
The group of officers is part of a special 5,000-strong police force launched last week to combat crime that is strangling commerce in some Mexican regions.
The gendarmerie is made up of fresh recruits whose average age is 28 and who have never served on another police force.
The group sent to Valle de Bravo will join about 600 other federal and Mexico state law enforcement officials, including soldiers and marines, who have recently been sent to the area 90 miles west of Mexico City.

immigrants and the immigration issues

As early as 1895 at the Atlanta International Exposition, the great African-American educator, Booker T. Washington delivered his famous "Cast Down Your Bucket Where You Are" speech, which he pleaded with the racist titans of industry to hire African Americans rather than import cheap foreign labor. His pleas were ignored.
Then, in 1969, Cesar Chavez, who understood the law of labor supply and demand, took up Washington's long ignored challenge to big business, and led a march to the Mexican border to protest illegal immigration, which he knew reduced the wages of hard working legal Hispanic immigrants, particularly the wages of farm workers, to poverty levels. Those pleas, too, were ignored.
Typical of the economic catastrophe thus unleashed in the 1970's was the plight of African Americans working as janitors in buildings in Los Angeles who earned high wages and substantial benefits until greedy businessmen began to hire independent contractors who in turn hired illegal immigrants. Within a year, wages were cut by two-thirds, and benefits eliminated.
Then in 1986 an amiable but naïve President Ronald Reagan ushered in the great Amnesty Bill, offering amnesty to millions of illegal immigrants in return for assurances that border security would be tightened, and employers of illegal immigrants vigorously prosecuted. Democrats protested that, while such an amnesty might cater to the greed of big business' thirst for profits, it would inevitably lure even more cheap labor to the U.S. at the expense of African Americans and legal immigrants desperate to feed their families.
In the 1980s, at a time when African American teenage unemployment approached 80 percent, big business even petitioned the INS for visas for more cheap foreign labor on grounds that there was an "unskilled labor shortage." Amnesty apologists claimed that Americans wouldn't do the "dirty work" that illegal immigrants would perform, deliberately ignoring the fact that Americans gratefully collect garbage or risk their lives in the coal mines if decent wages are paid - wages which are reduced to poverty levels by the influx of cheap foreign labor.
Again, the cries of protest and reason were ignored, and the results are being played out at the U.S. border today. Not satisfied with luring cheap foreign labor to the U.S., the pro-illegal immigration lobby persists in touting amnesty even as its promises of future amnesty lure little children to risk their lives in the desert. In the words of the tort lawyer, the U.S. has now become the world's "attractive nuisance".
In the teeth of a survey conducted by the Pew Hispanic Center that showed that only 7 percent of Hispanics thought there were "too few" Hispanic immigrants, much of the media continues to promulgate the myth that politicians need to lure even more illegal immigrants with promises or amnesty - presumably on the premise that, unlike Cesar Chavez, African Americans and poverty-stricken Hispanics are ignorant of the effect of cheap foreign labor on wages. They are not, and politicians such as President George W. Bush won precious few votes by claiming to believe it.
When a National Academy of Sciences study showed that illegal immigrants without a high school degree cost Americans $100,000.00 more in social services and education than they contributed in labor, the study was ignored by the amnesty lobby.
The Reagan/Bush amnesty agenda has failed and caused untold misery amidst economic catastrophe for minorities and the poor. It turned the most basic human notions of fairness and decency on its head - rewarding those who commit illegal entry, felony forgery of government issued documents such as social security cards, and failure to pay taxes, while punishing those who patiently wait years for legal entry, endure extensive background checks, health examinations, and high fees. The health aspect of illegal immigration has by itself alarmed public health officials who are seeing the dramatic rise of diseases such as drug-resistant tuberculosis among immigrants who enter without health inspections.
Those who advocate streamlined procedures for legal immigration rather than spending billions to accommodate illegal entrants are marginalized and denigrated, while those who resist e-verify and border security, and deliberately confuse legal immigration issues with illegal immigration issues, are rewarded with media accolades for their "humanity".
Meanwhile, countries whose governments are faced with an expanding population that their economies are unable to support find it is the course of least resistance to encourage its excess population to migrate north rather than take on internal reforms or to provide women with basic rights and access to contraception. (If human-exporting countries were at least asked to reimburse the U.S. for the social costs of such a policy, they might be less enthusiastic about exporting the people they can't support in their own country).
In short, the amnesty lobby that continues to lure little children to risk their lives in the desert with false promises and hope, has lost the moral high ground, and are unlikely to regain it if they persist in following the failed Reagan/Bush agenda.