Los Algodones, Baja California; Mexico

This is not the End of the World, but you can see it from here!



Saturday, September 20, 2014

Border Protests starting Sept 18, 2014

Protest Plans to Shut Down Ports of Entry Moving Forward

Plans to shut down ports of entry between the United States and Mexico by a citizen protest group are being finalized. The list of ports includes six Texas ports, four in Arizona, two in New Mexico and five in California. Organizers say this is the final list and plan to move forward on all ports listed.

“This event is for Patriotic Americans who feel strongly about our nation’s sovereignty and bringing our Marine, Sgt. Tahmooressi, home,” said event organizer Stasyi Barth in a statement posted on the groups website. Sgt. Tahmooressi is being held in a Mexican jail for allegedly entering Mexico with weapons that are illegal in that country. He claims the entry was accidental.

Clarifying her previous comments about militia groups not being welcome in the protest, Barth said, “This is NOT a militia event,” Barth explained. “No militia groups have been involved in the organizing of this event, nor are they planning on participating. The mere mention of ‘militia’ draws fear and headlines, which is obviously the intent of the media.”

“We are standing up for law enforcement, not against them,” she continued.
 “This is a peaceful protest to air our grievances to our government, as allowed by the Constitution.”

In Texas, the group plans on blocking ports of entry located.
One of the leaders in Texas told another media outlet they have about 200 people lined up in Texas and expect more to just show up at the scene.
Laredo,             Rio Grande City,             Presidio, Hildago,
Brownsville            Del Rio.

California protests are scheduled for.
Calexico West,    Calexico East,    Stay Mesa,        Tecate,

San Ysidro. New Mexico protests are planned for Columbus and Santa Theresa while in Arizona, the ports of entry of Naco, Nogales, Douglas and San Luis are planned for closure.

“This event is for you, every patriotic American, to express your grievances in a safe and peaceful way,” Barth said on her website. As far as firearms Barth explained, “Yes, some states allow you to carry a firearm and I will not impede on that right. However, please keep it hidden and safely away from others.”

The website details out rules of conduct for event attendees to adhere to in order to assure the safety of all involved on both sides of the protest. She said she is anticipating counter protests and encourages all participants to not engage them. “They will say angry, hateful and vile things; do not respond” Barth continued. “They are looking for news coverage that they can point to, proving you are the bad guy.”

The events are all scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. CDT (8 a.m. PDT)           

Thursday, August 28, 2014

New Police force first test. Mexico City Kidnaping

Mexico lake town besieged by kidnappings is first assignment for new police force

The first assignment for members of a new police force created to combat crimes affecting industry, farms and businesses is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings, an official said Tuesday. Hundreds of members of the new force, known as the gendarmerie, have traveled to the town alongside a pine-rimmed lake.
A federal official said the group of officers is one of several being deployed throughout Mexico. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media.
PHOTO: FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings.
In recent weeks, kidnappers have targeted Mexico City residents who keep a second home in the town as well as working class people.
Authorities say the kidnappers are members of La Familia Michoacana drug cartel.
The group of officers is part of a special 5,000-strong police force launched last week to combat crime that is strangling commerce in some Mexican regions.
The gendarmerie is made up of fresh recruits whose average age is 28 and who have never served on another police force.
The group sent to Valle de Bravo will join about 600 other federal and Mexico state law enforcement officials, including soldiers and marines, who have recently been sent to the area 90 miles west of Mexico City.
MEXICO CITY — The first assignment for members of a new police force created to combat crimes affecting industry, farms and businesses is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings, an official said Tuesday.
Hundreds of members of the new force, known as the gendarmerie, have traveled to the town alongside a pine-rimmed lake.
A federal official said the group of officers is one of several being deployed throughout Mexico. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media.
PHOTO: FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
In recent weeks, kidnappers have targeted Mexico City residents who keep a second home in the town as well as working class people.
Authorities say the kidnappers are members of La Familia Michoacana drug cartel.
The group of officers is part of a special 5,000-strong police force launched last week to combat crime that is strangling commerce in some Mexican regions.
The gendarmerie is made up of fresh recruits whose average age is 28 and who have never served on another police force.
The group sent to Valle de Bravo will join about 600 other federal and Mexico state law enforcement officials, including soldiers and marines, who have recently been sent to the area 90 miles west of Mexico City.
MEXICO CITY — The first assignment for members of a new police force created to combat crimes affecting industry, farms and businesses is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings, an official said Tuesday.
Hundreds of members of the new force, known as the gendarmerie, have traveled to the town alongside a pine-rimmed lake.
A federal official said the group of officers is one of several being deployed throughout Mexico. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media.
PHOTO: FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
In recent weeks, kidnappers have targeted Mexico City residents who keep a second home in the town as well as working class people.
Authorities say the kidnappers are members of La Familia Michoacana drug cartel.
The group of officers is part of a special 5,000-strong police force launched last week to combat crime that is strangling commerce in some Mexican regions.
The gendarmerie is made up of fresh recruits whose average age is 28 and who have never served on another police force.
The group sent to Valle de Bravo will join about 600 other federal and Mexico state law enforcement officials, including soldiers and marines, who have recently been sent to the area 90 miles west of Mexico City.
MEXICO CITY — The first assignment for members of a new police force created to combat crimes affecting industry, farms and businesses is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings, an official said Tuesday.
Hundreds of members of the new force, known as the gendarmerie, have traveled to the town alongside a pine-rimmed lake.
A federal official said the group of officers is one of several being deployed throughout Mexico. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media.
PHOTO: FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2014, file photo, officers belonging to Mexico's newest police force, known as the gendarmerie, salute during the launching ceremony for the new force at the Federal Police headquarters in Mexico City. Officials said Tuesday Aug. 27, 2014, that the first assignment for members of the new police force is Valle de Bravo, a chic resort town near Mexico City that has seen a recent spate of kidnappings. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo, File)
In recent weeks, kidnappers have targeted Mexico City residents who keep a second home in the town as well as working class people.
Authorities say the kidnappers are members of La Familia Michoacana drug cartel.
The group of officers is part of a special 5,000-strong police force launched last week to combat crime that is strangling commerce in some Mexican regions.
The gendarmerie is made up of fresh recruits whose average age is 28 and who have never served on another police force.
The group sent to Valle de Bravo will join about 600 other federal and Mexico state law enforcement officials, including soldiers and marines, who have recently been sent to the area 90 miles west of Mexico City.

immigrants and the immigration issues

As early as 1895 at the Atlanta International Exposition, the great African-American educator, Booker T. Washington delivered his famous "Cast Down Your Bucket Where You Are" speech, which he pleaded with the racist titans of industry to hire African Americans rather than import cheap foreign labor. His pleas were ignored.
Then, in 1969, Cesar Chavez, who understood the law of labor supply and demand, took up Washington's long ignored challenge to big business, and led a march to the Mexican border to protest illegal immigration, which he knew reduced the wages of hard working legal Hispanic immigrants, particularly the wages of farm workers, to poverty levels. Those pleas, too, were ignored.
Typical of the economic catastrophe thus unleashed in the 1970's was the plight of African Americans working as janitors in buildings in Los Angeles who earned high wages and substantial benefits until greedy businessmen began to hire independent contractors who in turn hired illegal immigrants. Within a year, wages were cut by two-thirds, and benefits eliminated.
Then in 1986 an amiable but naïve President Ronald Reagan ushered in the great Amnesty Bill, offering amnesty to millions of illegal immigrants in return for assurances that border security would be tightened, and employers of illegal immigrants vigorously prosecuted. Democrats protested that, while such an amnesty might cater to the greed of big business' thirst for profits, it would inevitably lure even more cheap labor to the U.S. at the expense of African Americans and legal immigrants desperate to feed their families.
In the 1980s, at a time when African American teenage unemployment approached 80 percent, big business even petitioned the INS for visas for more cheap foreign labor on grounds that there was an "unskilled labor shortage." Amnesty apologists claimed that Americans wouldn't do the "dirty work" that illegal immigrants would perform, deliberately ignoring the fact that Americans gratefully collect garbage or risk their lives in the coal mines if decent wages are paid - wages which are reduced to poverty levels by the influx of cheap foreign labor.
Again, the cries of protest and reason were ignored, and the results are being played out at the U.S. border today. Not satisfied with luring cheap foreign labor to the U.S., the pro-illegal immigration lobby persists in touting amnesty even as its promises of future amnesty lure little children to risk their lives in the desert. In the words of the tort lawyer, the U.S. has now become the world's "attractive nuisance".
In the teeth of a survey conducted by the Pew Hispanic Center that showed that only 7 percent of Hispanics thought there were "too few" Hispanic immigrants, much of the media continues to promulgate the myth that politicians need to lure even more illegal immigrants with promises or amnesty - presumably on the premise that, unlike Cesar Chavez, African Americans and poverty-stricken Hispanics are ignorant of the effect of cheap foreign labor on wages. They are not, and politicians such as President George W. Bush won precious few votes by claiming to believe it.
When a National Academy of Sciences study showed that illegal immigrants without a high school degree cost Americans $100,000.00 more in social services and education than they contributed in labor, the study was ignored by the amnesty lobby.
The Reagan/Bush amnesty agenda has failed and caused untold misery amidst economic catastrophe for minorities and the poor. It turned the most basic human notions of fairness and decency on its head - rewarding those who commit illegal entry, felony forgery of government issued documents such as social security cards, and failure to pay taxes, while punishing those who patiently wait years for legal entry, endure extensive background checks, health examinations, and high fees. The health aspect of illegal immigration has by itself alarmed public health officials who are seeing the dramatic rise of diseases such as drug-resistant tuberculosis among immigrants who enter without health inspections.
Those who advocate streamlined procedures for legal immigration rather than spending billions to accommodate illegal entrants are marginalized and denigrated, while those who resist e-verify and border security, and deliberately confuse legal immigration issues with illegal immigration issues, are rewarded with media accolades for their "humanity".
Meanwhile, countries whose governments are faced with an expanding population that their economies are unable to support find it is the course of least resistance to encourage its excess population to migrate north rather than take on internal reforms or to provide women with basic rights and access to contraception. (If human-exporting countries were at least asked to reimburse the U.S. for the social costs of such a policy, they might be less enthusiastic about exporting the people they can't support in their own country).
In short, the amnesty lobby that continues to lure little children to risk their lives in the desert with false promises and hope, has lost the moral high ground, and are unlikely to regain it if they persist in following the failed Reagan/Bush agenda.


Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Mexico spill could cost Grupo Mexico billions of pesos

UPDATE 1-Mexico spill could cost Grupo Mexico billions of pesos- Gov't

Mexican metals miner and railroad operator Grupo Mexico could face a bill running into billions of pesos to clean up a toxic spill that could prove to be the country's worst mining disaster in modern times, the government said on Tuesday.
Grupo Mexico could face an initial fine of 40 million pesos ($3.05 million) over the spill into a river near the Buenavista copper mine in the northern state of Sonora, Mexico's environmental prosecutor Guillermo Haro said.
The company is in the midst of a $3.4 billion expansion project at the mine, which was formerly known as Cananea and has the largest proven copper reserves in the world. The expansion aims to boost production capacity to 1.3 million tonnes by 2017.
Haro's office says Grupo Mexico pumped 40,000 cubic meters of toxic mining acid into the Bacanuchi river. It said the clean up of the spill "could run into hundreds of millions or even billions of pesos".
Shares in Grupo Mexico rose 1.24 percent on Tuesday at 47.21 pesos per share following news of the scale of the potential fine.
The spill could be "the worst environmental disaster in the country's mining industry in modern times," Per Environment Minister Juan Jose Guerra.
Last week, Mexico's Congress urged the government to cancel Grupo Mexico's concession to operate the mine. (1 US dollar = 13.1063 Mexican peso) .

crack split the Earth in the Mexican state of Sonora

A giant crack split the Earth in the Mexican state of Sonora this week, cutting a roadway in two and leaving locals not only surprised but puzzled as to what could have caused the Earth to separate. At the same time, many have become worried that whatever caused the two-thirds-of-a-mile trench might be a precursor. But scientists insist that there is no cause for alarm, even though they may not know -- yet -- exactly what caused the giant crack.
Traveler's Today reported Aug. 23 that the giant crack that recently appeared outside Hermosillo in Sonora in northwest Mexico has been labeled by scientists as basically harmless. Stretching a kilometer, the giant crack is almost five meters (16 ft) wide and eight meters (26 ft) deep and set in the middle of an expanse of farmland. A video taken with a camera attached to a drone flying the length of the massive trench shows what looks like a giant scar on the Earth.
The giant crack in the Earth lies in an area impacted by the San Andreas Fault, and some local officials, according to News.com, believe that a recent earthquake (Sunday) might have caused the fissure. But
"It's definitely not a cause for alarm for the population," Martin Valencia Moreno, head of the National Autonomous University of Mexico's Regional Station of the Geological Institute, told the Excelsior newspaper, according to Huffington Post. "It's more something sensationalist and people like to encourage that sort of thing."
Moreno added that he did not believe that an eartquake had caused the deep fissure, either, noting that with an earthquake, the ground levels on the sides of the crack would have been staggered. Instead, they appeared to be relatively even, the fissure seeming to have be produced by a pulling apart and a falling away.
A group of geologists at the University of Sonora believe that the fissure was created by when land collapsed into what had been an underground stream. The stream was likely created by leakage from a farmer-built levee, which had created an underground stream that eventually weakened the earth above it, causing it to erode and collapse.
The unexpected rift divided Highway 26 and has caused a disruption in local traffic flow, forcing vehicles to drive around the affected area. And despite the reassuring words of experts, locals still worry, especially since another giant crack has been reported nearby.

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Coke man run over by vehicle

Police: Man's legs run over at taquería in Palmview




Autopedestrian accident at the Taquería Tamaulipas in Palmview

Authorities are investigating a Monday morning accident that ended with a man's legs being run over outside a drive-thru taco restaurant in Palmview.
It all happened at the Taquería Tamaulipas off La Homa Road and 2 Mile Line around 11:30 a.m. Monday.
Hidalgo County Sheriff's Office deputies told Action 4 News that a man was sitting down at the drive-thru restaurant.
A car came through and reportedly ran over the man's legs.
Investigators said the victim was a Coca-Cola employee who was working on a machine when the accident happened.
Owners of the restaurant declined to comment about the accident.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Deported U.S. military veterans activate in Tijuana



The Bunker of the Deported Veterans of America is located on 3rd street, near Parque Teniente Guerrero, on top of Baja Gym. Dark steps behind an iron door next to the gym's entrance lead you to two green doors and an open space. One of the green doors has a handwritten sign that reads “Bunker: Support House of the Deported Veterans of America. Director Hector Barajas.”
I knock on the door a couple times until I hear “Pasale.”
In the corner of a large open room, behind improvised desks, sit two veterans on their computers. A map of Mexico and a bunch of Army certificates decorate this corner they use as office space. The rest of the room has all the necessities for basic living. A loud fan barely helps allay the summer heat. A large American flag next to a smaller Mexican flag act as curtains for the sliding glass doors that lead to a balcony with no railing.
This is Spc. Hector Barajas’s home, a veteran who served in the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne division from 1995 until 2001. Barajas shares his home with fellow deported veterans. Veterans can stay at the bunker while they find a better situation. Alex Caballero, a former Marine (1998-2007), is calling the place home for now.
“I see this house as the hub for all the deported veterans around the world,” says Barajas, “because this is where we've been doing a lot of the advocating, raising awareness, protests.... We are also working on an actual list of who are the deported veterans; these are numbers that the VA or Homeland Security doesn't have.”
Barajas estimates that there are between 3000 and 50,000 deported veterans around the world. He estimates that there’re more than 1000 in Baja California.
“The problem is that when you get deported, you think you are the only one. I talked to a guy that got deported to Jamaica, so I connected him to other veterans that have been deported there. We're forming virtual bunkers around the world. If someone gets deported in Tamaulipas, I help him connect with other veterans in the area. I tried to get these guys motivated, to raise awareness of their situation and where they are at and to get organized.”
Besides connecting veterans with one another, Barajas works to get benefits for them and to get them back home.
“Benefits are going to be easier to get; going back home is going to be more difficult. If they made me sign something that says I could go home and get none of my benefits, I would do it right now. If they tell me to jump from 100 airplanes, I'll serve a year in Iraq if I have to. I would do whatever it takes to go home.”
Like most deportees, a crime was committed for the system to notice them.
“A crime shouldn't take away your citizenship,” says Barajas. “I served a three-year prison term for a discharge of a firearm on to a vehicle…. I paid my debt to society.”
Alex Caballero claims he was unaware that he was part of a scam for Schwarzenegger's campaign as he presents me with a mountain of evidence and law jargon. Both, Caballero and Barajas call California their home. Barajas moved to Compton when he was seven years old; Caballero has lived all over California since he was two.
I ask them what comfort of home (besides family) they are missing and if there's something I can bring them next time I come back from San Diego.
“Family comes and visits the guys — for some is every week, others a month or so,” says Barajas. “You know what I miss, Church's Fried Chicken, KFC is not the same here. Church's hot and spicy is my favorite, the chicken over here doesn't taste the same at all.” — Hector misses a simple commodity, and since there's a Church's Chicken just across the border, I'll be bringing him some hot and spicy.
Alex in the other hand misses something that I cannot provide. “Just the freedom itself, the general feeling of being part of America, being around what you know, your family and friends.”