Los Algodones, Baja California; Mexico

This is not the End of the World, but you can see it from here!



Saturday, February 14, 2015

Federals battle Local Police during Labor Dispute


Mexico: 5 Federal Police Wounded in Standoff With Local Cops

A revolt by local police who barricaded themselves inside a station for nearly two weeks in a labor protest erupted in a clash that wounded least five federal agents in southern Mexico on Friday.
Between 250 and 300 local police officers have been hunkered down in the station in the town of Santa Maria Coyotopec for the last 13 days to demand raises and better working conditions, the Oaxaca state government said in a statement.
They shot at federal police who tried to remove them Friday, the government alleged. Five federal agents were wounded in the legs by bullet shrapnel, but their lives were said not to be in danger.
Some of the local officers contended it was not them but rather federal agents who opened fire in the pre-dawn confrontation.
"The federal police tried to get in through the main door, but my companions reacted and the clash began," said a policeman inside the compound who gave his name as only Luis for fear of possible reprisals.
Jeyco Perez, identified as one of the leaders of the revolt, told Milenio TV that they were only using shields to defend themselves and had not fired weapons.
An Associated Press reporter at the scene saw the local officers carrying batons and riot shields, but no weapons were readily visible. The entry to the station was barricaded with a truck and metal fencing.
The locals captured at least three federal officers but later released them.
One, Mauricio Villela, said he was not harmed during his seven hours of captivity. He denied that it was federal police who opened fire, saying, "We did not shoot."
Hundreds of police remained in the area of the station, which the state government said holds more than 3,000 firearms and nearly 500,000 rounds of ammunition.
Oaxaca state security commissioner Victor Altamirano told Milenio that the operation seeks to keep those munitions from being misused by the local police.
Just before midday about 50 people who were apparently civilian residents of Santa Maria Coyotepec gathered at the station holding signs in support the protest.
The town is about 3 miles (5 kilometers) south of the state capital, also named Oaxaca.
A revolt by local police who barricaded themselves inside a station for nearly two weeks in a labor protest erupted in a clash that wounded least five federal agents in southern Mexico on Friday.
Between 250 and 300 local police officers have been hunkered down in the station in the town of Santa Maria Coyotopec for the last 13 days to demand raises and better working conditions, the Oaxaca state government said in a statement.
They shot at federal police who tried to remove them Friday, the government alleged. Five federal agents were wounded in the legs by bullet shrapnel, but their lives were said not to be in danger.
Some of the local officers contended it was not them but rather federal agents who opened fire in the pre-dawn confrontation.
"The federal police tried to get in through the main door, but my companions reacted and the clash began," said a policeman inside the compound who gave his name as only Luis for fear of possible reprisals.
Jeyco Perez, identified as one of the leaders of the revolt, told Milenio TV that they were only using shields to defend themselves and had not fired weapons.
An Associated Press reporter at the scene saw the local officers carrying batons and riot shields, but no weapons were readily visible. The entry to the station was barricaded with a truck and metal fencing.
The locals captured at least three federal officers but later released them.
One, Mauricio Villela, said he was not harmed during his seven hours of captivity. He denied that it was federal police who opened fire, saying, "We did not shoot."
Hundreds of police remained in the area of the station, which the state government said holds more than 3,000 firearms and nearly 500,000 rounds of ammunition.
Oaxaca state security commissioner Victor Altamirano told Milenio that the operation seeks to keep those munitions from being misused by the local police.
Just before midday about 50 people who were apparently civilian residents of Santa Maria Coyotepec gathered at the station holding signs in support the protest.
The town is about 3 miles (5 kilometers) south of the state capital, also named Oaxaca.

Mexicans being shot by Police in USA

— President Enrique Peña Nieto lashed out Friday at what he called the “disproportionate use of lethal force” by police officers in Washington state that led to the death of an unarmed Mexican migrant.
Peña Nieto joined lawmakers in condemning the death of Antonio Zambrano Montes, a 35-year-old orchard worker who was slain by police officers in Pasco, Wash., on Tuesday. Video of the incident shows an unarmed Zambrano with his arms in the air slumping to the sidewalk after police officers open fire from a short distance away.
“I have ordered the Foreign Secretariat to offer support to the family . . . and to carefully follow the investigation into this lamentable and outrageous act,” Peña Nieto said.
Earlier in the day, the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of Mexico’s Congress, condemned the shooting of Zambrano as an “act that outrages all Mexicans.”
“We voice our strongest condemnation of these acts of police brutality,” a statement from the leadership of the 500-seat legislative body said.
The statement followed a condemnation issued late Thursday by Mexico’s Foreign Secretariat, which accused Pasco police officers of using “disproportionate” force against Zambrano, who emigrated to the United States 10 years ago.
“The government of Mexico deeply condemns incidents in which force is used in a disproportionate manner, even more so when that use of force leads to loss of life,” the statement said.
A statement from the government of the Mexican state of Michoacan, where Zambrano grew up, called Zambrano’s death “murder.”
Three police officers in Pasco chased down Zambrano and shot him after he allegedly hurled rocks at automobiles and the officers. Pasco, in southeast Washington state, has a large community of Mexican residents.


Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2015/02/13/256646/mexico-denounces-police-killing.html#storylink=cpy

Bus Train Collision Mexico

Mexico bus-train collision kills 16

Saturday 14 February 2015 10.58
The collision happened when the bus was attempting to cross rail tracks in the city of Anahuac, Nuevo Leon
The collision happened when the bus was attempting to cross rail tracks in the city of Anahuac, Nuevo Leon
At least 16 people were killed and 30 were injured when a freight train slammed into a packed passenger bus in northeastern Mexico last night, authorities said, warning the death toll could rise.
The collision happened when the bus was attempting to cross rail tracks in the city of Anahuac, Nuevo Leon, state civil protection chief Jorge Camacho told AFP.
The accident occurred just after 5pm (11pm Irish time) at Camarones station, near the border with the United States.
Two children were among the 16 dead, said Mayor Desiderio Urteaga, although other local officials warned that the final toll could be nearer to at least 20 because some passengers were trapped after the crash.

Images broadcast by local media showed the bus smashed open and split in half by the force of the train.
Nine women and five men were identified among the dead, in addition to the two children, Mr Camacho said.
Of the 30 people injured, 22 were taken to hospitals in the nearby border town of Nuevo Laredo, around 60km away.
The bus, which normally transports around 40 people, was traveling with 60 passengers, as it made its way from Nuevo Laredo to the northern city of Nueva Rosita.
Mr Camacho said an investigation was under way to determine whether the bus driver was trying to beat the train when the vehicle was struck.
But prosecutors would determine the cause of the accident who was responsible, he added.
There was no fog or rain in the area at the time, he said.
Prosecutors were already at the scene.

Friday, February 6, 2015

Gang Member Threatened Police

A reputed member of the Vallucos prison gang threatened a  police sergeant early Sunday morning and attempted to fight another policeman at the city jail.
Police arrested 24-year-old Michael A. Montoya after a fight near the 17th Street bar district, according to police reports filed with the McAllen Municipal Court.
Montoya repeatedly threatened the officers who arrested him, according to court records. When police said they would charge him for making threats against them, Montoya apparently wasn’t impressed.
“I don’t give a (expletive),” Montoya said, according to the police report. “I’ve done hard time and that ain’t shit to me (expletive).”
After arresting Montoya, police drove him to the intersection of Bicentennial Boulevard and Chicago Avenue.
A witness at the intersection recognized Montoya — a short, stocky man with neck tattoos — and told police that Montoya had participated in a fight. During the fight, several men attacked another man with a metal rod and yelled that they were connected with the Vallucos, according to the witness.
Police told Montoya they would add aggravated assault with a deadly weapon to the charges against him.
“I told you (expletive), I don’t give a (expletive),” Montoya said, according to the police report. “I’m going to look for you when I get out and (expletive) you up.”
When Montoya arrived at the McAllen Public Safety Building, a jailer removed his handcuffs. Montoya clenched his fists and taunted the officer who arrested him, according to the police report.
“Come on (expletive), I told you I was going to (expletive) you up,” Montoya said, according to the police report.
The policeman ignored Montoya.
Police charged Montoya with two counts of obstruction or retaliation against a peace officer, a third-degree felony; and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, a second-degree felony.
A judge set Montoya's combined bond at $300,000 for the three felony charges.
Montoya hadn't posted bond by Wednesday morning and remained at the Hidalgo County jail.

Friday, January 23, 2015

Mexico 14 Killed More May Die

14 killed in Mexico road accident

At least 14 people died and 19 others were injured Thursday when a bus collided with a freight truck in the northwestern Mexican state of Sonora, authorities said.

The accident happened before dawn on the road connecting Ciudad Obregon with Guaymas, the state coordinator for emergency services, Carlos Jesus Arias, said.

So far there are 14 people dead, the official said, adding that the injured were taken to two hospitals in Ciudad Obregon.

The bodies recovered at the scene are completely burnt and will be difficult to identify, Arias said.

The crash was apparently caused by an attempt by the driver of the bus, en route to the border metropolis of Tijuana, to pass a cantaloupe-laden truck on a bridge, he said.

Some of the 19 injured survivors are in critical condition, authorities said.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Immigrants will now get Mexican Birth Certificates in the United States


Immigrants Can Now Get Mexican Birth Certificates in US


The Mexican government on Thursday will start issuing birth certificates to its citizens at consulates in the United States, seeking to make it easier for them to apply for U.S. work permits, driver's licenses and protection from deportation.
Until now, Mexico has required citizens to get birth certificates at government offices in Mexico. Many of those living in the U.S. ask friends and relatives back home to retrieve them, which can delay their applications for immigration or other programs.
Now, even as Republicans in Congress try to quash President Barack Obama's reprieve to millions of immigrants living illegally in the U.S., Mexico is trying to help them apply for programs that would allow them to remain temporarily in the country and continue sending money back to relatives across the border.
"It is a huge help. It helps individuals really begin to formulate their formal identity in this country," said Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles.
About half of the 11 million immigrants living in the United States illegally are from Mexico, and immigration experts estimate that roughly 3 million Mexicans could be eligible to apply for work permits and protection from deportation under the administration's plan.
About two weeks ago, California — which is home to more Mexicans than any other state — began issuing driver's licenses to immigrants in the country illegally.
Starting Thursday, the country's 50 consulates in the United States will be able to access data maintained by regional governments in Mexico and print birth certificates at the consulates, said Arturo Sanchez, consul for press and commercial affairs in Santa Ana, California.
Consulates should be able to issue birth certificates for nearly all birthplaces in Mexico, but some rural villages where documents are not digitally recorded may not be covered, Sanchez said.
Over the past year, the Santa Ana consulate has seen a surge in the demand for documents. Daily appointments have jumped by a third to nearly 400, with many people trying to get birth certificates, Sanchez said.
Mexican immigrants usually seek birth certificates to obtain a passport or consular identification card so they can then apply for a driver's license or immigration relief, he said.
In California, Mexican consular officials have supported the rollout of the new driver's license program, holding information sessions and offering test preparation classes to help immigrants pass the written test required to get a license.
Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies, said she believes Mexico is trying to make it easier for its citizens to stay here because of the money they send across the border.
Mexican migrant workers, many who live in the United States, sent home $21.6 billion to their families in 2013, according to the country's central bank.
Vaughan, whose organization advocates for tighter limits on immigration, said the integrity of birth certificates is critical because they are used to issue key identity documents like passports.
"If we can trust the Mexican government to do its due diligence and establish a system with integrity, then this will work and it is up to us to make sure we are communicating with them about what we need to see in terms of integrity," she said. "That is a big if."

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Deported But, they Don't get to take belongings and Life with them

Derek Lucas Reyes, 20, went from being undocumented in the U.S. to undocumented in his native Mexico.
He sits at a table after breakfast in a shelter filled with people recently deported from the U.S. to Nogales, Sonora. At his feet is a paper shopping bag the Department of Homeland Security gave him for his belongings. Inside the bag: his deportation paperwork, a toothbrush, toothpaste and some other necessities he got from Mexican aid workers.
Lucas Reyes just finished serving a 30-day federal sentence for illegal crossing. When he was caught by the Border Patrol in the Arizona desert, he says, he had a backpack of essentials.
"I had an ID, money and a cellphone that I didn't get back. In that phone were phone numbers for my family who could've given me shelter. Now I have nothing — no money and no way to contact people I know," he says.
A report released Wednesday by the humanitarian group No More Deaths says it's not an unusual situation. The U.S. government is deporting thousands of people back to Mexico without their belongings, and according to the report, they're being sent back without money (they used up everything being held in Detention) or identification cards (As ID was considered Fake).
"It's every day," says David Hill, co-author of the report. It's based on more than 14,000 cases out of Arizona and echoes similar findings by University of Arizona researchers borderwide.
Roughly one-third of people deported to Mexico were missing something. Here's how it seems to happen: When people are arrested, they go from Border Patrol custody to U.S. Marshals to local jails or to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Their property stays behind.
"It doesn't get transferred to where it needs to be for the person to receive it upon deportation and it gets destroyed after 30 days — declared abandoned and destroyed," Hill says.
Under the U.S. Constitution, property should be held only if it's evidence in a crime or was actually used to commit a crime — neither of which seems to be the case here. The Department of Homeland Security oversees both ICE and Customs and Border Protection. In an email, DHS spokeswoman Marsha Catron writes the agency has standards to ensure detainees' property is safeguarded and returned when they are released or deported. "Any allegation of missing property will be thoroughly investigated," the email says.
Among the most problematic charges are missing IDs and missing money. Hill says when people do get their money back, it's often in a form utterly useless in Mexico.
"We're talking about checks that are drawn on U.S. banks and cannot be deposited in Mexican banks, whether you have an account or not, whether you have an ID or not," Hill says.
Lucas Reyes has no money or ID, so he's worried about traveling 2,000 miles to his home in the southern Mexican state of Quintana Roo, next to Central America.
"Mexican authorities could think I'm illegally in the country. I could be kidnapped because people might assume I'm not from Mexico," he says.
Among other recommendations, the No More Deaths report calls for DHS to work harder to keep people and their property together — and to return money in cash.